Glady to High Falls on Shavers Fork

Huttonsville, WV
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Glady to High Falls on Shavers Fork is a 5 mile out and back trail located in the state of West Virginia that features a waterfall and is rated as moderate. The trail offers a number of activity options and is accessible from April until November. Dogs are also able to use this trail.

The trail is an old rail road bed making it a nice easy walk on 98% of the trail. The 1st mile or two is skirted by private land but the trail is eventualy all National Forrest land. The last portion of the trail to reach High Falls is about 1.5 miles of walking a live rail raod track so be aware of the trains running 2 or 3 times a day. I beleive the Boy Scouts camp at the shelter by the falls a few times a year and most trains stop at High Falls shelter as they pass thru so the tourists can walk down and have a look at the falls. At times the trail in is not well maintained and may be grown up somewhat. Bug repellent in the summer and waterproof boots in wet weather are a must. The rail trail is washed out at one point on the trail but is passable on the uphill side of the wash. There you'll see a clear water mountain pond that is very pretty. There are several other ponds and streams that make for great veiws or pictures too. Once on Shavers Fork the trout fishing is good when the DNR has been stocking the stream, not many fisherman go this far in so there is no fishing pressure around the falls. Tis trail is part of the "West Fork of the Greenbrier" and is the least traveled portion since the tunnell at Glady was closed due to safety reasons. The trail head of this portion of the trail is not marked but if you use the link I provided it is easily found. We parked at the trail head for three days and no one bothered the Jeep. You may run into turkey, bear or deer on the trail or those hunting such if season is in.

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1 Completed 1 Reviews

Camped there several times but on one night a tourist train stopped right there! Nice people, didn't stay long. Easy trail to get there and we made a nice one night loop. Hardly run into anyone along the trail and loved that old train tunnel made back in the early 1900s. Love to go back again!

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1 Completed 1 Reviews

its a great trail and the water falls great its a blast to jump from and play on. ive never seen another person on this trail while im on it

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1 Completed 1 Reviews

Just to clear up the first 2 reviews are 2 totally different ways to get to High Falls. The first one talking about entering the woods from the field is going over mnt. On the trail. The 2nd is the mellow longer walk down the old railroad grade. The first way over the mnt is the way I like. Great work out and faster this way over the trail. It's my 2nd home we love it out there.

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7 Completed 7 Reviews

There are places right in the first few miles of the trail, right when you really enter the woods from the fields, where the trail is a little hard to follow. It isn't bad as long as you are paying attention. Once you get to the falls, there are swimming holes abound if you are feeling sweaty and brave. I am not sure if I buy the 5 miles for a loop, I think it is more like 7-8 miles for the loop, which is also the length it is given in my guidebook and cheat mountain map. We didn't see many people until we were at the falls and one of the train tours stopped there. Soon there were dozens of people swarming around. Kinda surreal after being in the woods hiking for a couple hours.

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1 Completed 1 Reviews

This trail is really part of the "West Fork Trail" and according to the helpful link below, it is mile 22 and beyond. Don't let the description above scear you off! Mostly nice trail and only a slight grade down and back up to get out.
The wife , my Brother and myself saw the link online and we walked in instead of biked. This is an old train bed trail that is mostly easy walking. There is no drinkable water so pack some or bring a filter which is what we did. Plenty of streams and ponds along the trail. Nice veiws along the way with deer and wild turkeys abound. Stay on the trail until you reach the national forrest bearing tree. The trail is skirted with no trespassing signs but you are allowed to walk or bike the trail.
At one point and once inside the National Forrest the trail splits and you can go either trail down to the live train tracks running along Shavers Fork. Take the left trail to avoid a long trek on the train tracks. There are parts of the trail that are grown up a bit but if you pay attention there is no fear of getting lost. Just before the trail ends at the tracks the trail (old RR Bed) has been washed out. There is a nice clear pond to the left and we chose to cross the wash out on the left or uphill side of the wash out. Another short walk down the trail and you should already be seeing glimpses of the tracks and river from the trail. At the tracks turn left and follow them to HIGH FALL's. You cant miss the small shelter and out houses on the right built for the train passangers. There is a nice trail leading to an overlook of the falls. We camped on the river about 200 yrds down stream of the falls. Bring your pole, the trout were awsome with the morel mushrooms we found along the way.
The link below provides a much better description of this part of the trail.

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