Corona

Join the largest community of outdoor enthusiasts.

Get Started

Upgrade to Pro

Unlimited access to National Geographic TOPO! & Trails Illustrated Maps

Learn More »

Best Trails

Black Star Canyon Trail

Silverado, CA

Hiking
+

More Activities

Walking
Mountain Biking

Black Star Canyon is a 6 mile out and back trail located near Silverado, California that features a waterfall and is rated as moderate. The trail is primarily used for hiking, mountain biking and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail but should be kept on leash.

  • Best Hiking

  • Best Mountain Biking

  • Best Trail Running

Skyline Drive

Corona, CA

Recent Reviews

Person_placeholder

Indian Truck Trail
by

1 Completed 1 Reviews

Hiked 3 hours up before turning back around. Lots of cyclists and people driving up the road in jeeps (only part I didn't like). Beautiful views. The weather was cold and overcast but definitely worth the hike.

Picture?width=50&height=50

Skyline Drive
by

6 Completed 6 Reviews

Went on a sunny March day with my girlfriend of the time. It was a very easy going hike for her but at the same time offered many little side trails and tiny expeditions to have some fun as well. Overall good hike, great view at top of hill.

Picture?width=50&height=50

Indian Truck Trail
by

2 Completed 1 Reviews

My wife was sent on a project to southern California and asked if I would like to go out there for a few days. In order to justify the miles, travel time, and jet lag I wanted to go for more than just the weekend, particularly after viewing the beautiful vistas online made for trail running. I packed my camelback and Altra Superiors and was ready for California. I didn’t have to wait long. I arrived Thursday night. First thing Friday morning I took my wife into the job site she was working at and then took off to the Indian Truck Trail. It wasn’t as easy to find as advertised at least for an out of towner. I wandered through a new upscale residential community in Temecula before deciding to park the Riverside County park nestled between the mountains and newly constructed homes and took out on foot to find the dirt trail winding up a mountain. It was about a mile into the run that I definitively determined I was on the proper path when I spotted a small twin inch by four inch metal sign protruding from the right of the trail that read 501S ITT. It wasn’t long after seeing that sign that the steep ascent started to kick my butt. The first mile or so of the trail surface was a hard and windy almost uneven cement covered in desert dust with a steady and steep incline.

The hot sun and desert vegetation along with the constant scurrying of lizards across my path made me feel like I was running in one of the areas described by Christopher McDougal in Born to Run. I envisioned drug lords rounding the corner of the dirt road at any moment. I witness shipping containers in a glade below a cliff with a no trespassing sign. I thought to myself that surely they contained some type of illegal contraband. Those thoughts were further reinforced when around one bend I saw stairs chiseled into the rock face of a desert cliff seemingly made for an escape.

Further up the climb, which was half running half hiking, I gazed out onto the mountain valley daydreaming that I was Butch Cassidy and the Federalis would be coming over the ridge for me at any moment. The buzzards flying overhead assured me that my caracas would not remain there long. The mix of walking and running permitted me to take plenty of pictures on the way up as I climbed nearly 1,200 feet over roughly three and half miles that first day on the ITT. IMG_4109I decided to turn back when a large rattle snake crossed my path. It was there that my run became effortless with gravity on my side and the wind at my back. I sped down the hill but at the end did not have much left in the tank, both literally and figuratively. My two liter camelback was nearly drained on what amounted to a 7.3 mile run. Salt crystals from dried perspiration collected on my brow, nose, and mouth. It was so challenging that I couldn’t wait to tackle it again.

Saturday and Sunday my wife and I toured Los Angeles and Palm Springs. You can keep Los Angeles. However Palm Springs and the surrounding areas were gorgeous. The weekend also produced a family reunion as I was able to meet up with cousins and an uncle I hadn’t seen since I was a child. Monday it was back to work for my wife and for me back to the trails. Despite some pizza and a six pack of Sierra Nevada IPA the night before I was determined to tackle more of the ITT than I had on my first run. I wasn’t going to let a snake turn me back, though a mountain lion would be a different conversation. This time a pushed a little further before slowing down on the hills to a comfortable hike. I mixed in hiking and running and was feeling good when I came to the turnaround point from my previous run. I continued onward and upward. As I approached 3,000 feet in elevation the trail transitioned from a soft sand to a the more rocky surface I am familiar with on North Carolina trails.

The vegetation changed as well. In place of desert flowers and bushes, tall evergreen canopies appeared along the trail. Moss covered the surface of some of the rock faces. The air was crisp and light and a cool breeze gave me a second wind.

I continued on a little over five miles up the trail and up to nearly 3,200 feet in elevation. The only thing that kept me from going further was the clock and the fact that I had to get back to the hotel and cleaned up in time to pick up my wife from work. The race down the mountain was exhilarating and almost effortless.

I was sad to be leaving California, its challenging yet picturesque trails and beautiful mountains. Ironically, my first trail run this morning since returning home was cut short this morning by a turned ankle. I cursed the roots, mud, and rocky nature of the area trails. I longed to be back in California looking out onto the majestic vistas of the Santa Ana mountains.

Person_placeholder

Cleveland National Forest Trail
by

2 Completed 1 Reviews

Very fun hike if you like to go the distance
A friend of mine and I have done this trail multiple times and it's fun but be prepared for not much shade. The view from the top is amazing and makes it worth it

Picture?width=50&height=50

Coal Canyon - Santa Ana River, Coal Canyon Trails
by

1 Completed 1 Reviews

No access to coal Canyon only riverbed trail next to the freeway. Too bad I guess it used to be a good hike into the canyon but I heard there was an accident that put a stop to all that hiking back into the coal Canyon not allowed to go cross the railroad tracks that block it.

Person_placeholder

Skyline Drive
by

1 Completed 1 Reviews

Picture?width=50&height=50

Skyline Drive
by

4 Completed 2 Reviews

Person_placeholder

Skyline Drive
by Lisa LaFlame

12 Completed 2 Reviews

Really pleased to have discovered this trail right in my back yard! Also very pleased to see so many others making use of it on the morning I hiked it. It's a wide road, so plenty of room for all users to enjoy. I didn't do the rope/rock trail--I need to find that part out there, I just stayed on the road. Great views of the Inland Empire, San Gabriel Valley, and all our big mountain ranges. Also a beautiful trail as you make your way along it. Bring lots of water regardless of season. It's a long, steady sustained climb--to me it was easier, but it would be moderate if you're not used to hiking. Will try the Tin Mine trail at some point soon.

Icon_e7be8aad915571fe27512f777938728d

Coal Canyon - Santa Ana River, Coal Canyon Trails
by

3 Completed 2 Reviews

Came here after Thanksgiving to walk off the turkey, didn't see a single soul for the entirety of the hike which was awesome. Check out my write-up at http://travel.suwdo.com/2014/11/after-thanksgiving-hike-on-coal-canyon-trail/ complete with photos, map, and elevation profile.

Picture?width=50&height=50

Skyline Drive
by

1 Completed 1 Reviews

One of my favorite trails, rope/rock climbing, full body workout.

Support