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Best Trails

Tumbledown Mountain

Weld, ME

Tumbledown Mountain is a 4.3 mile out and back trail located near Weld, Maine that features a lake and is rated as moderate. The trail is primarily used for hiking and is accessible year-round. Dogs are also able to use this trail but must be kept on leash. No admission or parking fees.

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  • Best Mountain Biking

  • Best Trail Running

Recent Reviews

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Morse Mountain
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4 Completed 2 Reviews

Was nice hike with some steep portions. We went in November and didn't see much wildlife, but was great because there were hardly any people. Nice and quite. There are some marshes and some steep hills to clime in some areas and a beautiful view of the ocean at the end/mid-point of the trail. You can add more to the trail by walking down the beach or the small roads for viewing areas. Nice to see conservation/research that is keeping the area protected. Just a side note because we didn't know this before we went....They want everyone to wear something that is hunter orange, since some hunting does take place in this area. Also, we had to cross about 5" of water on one portion in the marsh on the way back because the tide had come in. So if you also plan/don't plan on getting your feet wet (another group had been walking barefoot and in shorts on the beach despite the brisk weather) then I suggest bringing something to get through the water. Luckily I had just bought some new tall hiking boots from Freeport and they were just tall enough to keep my feet dry :)

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Tablelands Trail
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4 Completed 1 Reviews

This place gets me started with my enjoyment of doing 'cameratography' while out on the trail. I's tough getting the perfect visual conditions for capturing the sights here. This is why I am completely with sharing camera work.

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Pleasant Mountain
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1 Completed 2 Reviews

We were so happy we got up and went hiking this morning and this was the one we chose !!! It was random and it was totally perfect !! Very steady incline that could feel very steep to beginners. It was slippery due to wet leaves, pine needles and ice but very clear cut path and well marked ! We ran into a few hikers and their furry campions but it was a very quiet and peaceful hike. It's a picture stopper for sure from start to finish.

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Southwest Ridge Trail - Pleasant Mountain
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1 Completed 2 Reviews

Really great hike, very well cut, clearly marked, wouldn't go for this if you are a beginner or have a hard time breathing comfortable walking up a small hill, this is a very steady incline with parts that were slippery due to wet leaves, pine needles and ice. The views were amazing from start to finish. We are so happy we got up and went for it this morning ! Beautiful day for it too

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Rattlesnake Mountain
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1 Completed 1 Reviews

Beautiful view, pretty steep incline but worth it!

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Bar Harbor Shore Path
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11 Completed 10 Reviews

The Bar Harbor shore path gets a lot of traffic in the summer and early fall months and for good reason, depending on the weather it can offer up breath taking views. Do you look away from the ocean at the row of expensive homes, or out to sea at fishing boats, sail boats, passing while watcher vessels, and cruise ships? Just walking slow and taking in the sweeping ocean views of the otter islands is relaxing, and there is many places to leave the path and explore along the ocean side. One of the sights you might see is the four mast schooner that anchors along the shore Path, a sight to behold when its sails are up.
What many don't know is that many years ago the Shore Path use to run all the way to Compass Harbor, but new home owners blocked a large section of the path with a wire fence, so at that point you have to either turn around and head back toward the town Pier or continue to follow the path as it turns inland and makes it way toward Main Street.
It's a shame the path no longer runs all the way to Compass Harbor because the Harbor was where George B. Dorr lived. His estate was named OLD FARM and there is a couple of paths that circle the area there. It also has two beaches. At the top of a very long set of stone steps is where the remains of OLD FARM can still be seen today.
To reach the shore Path in town, head down Main Street to the Town Pier. There is a metal fence that runs along the start of the path above the town beach. Two huge cannons over look the path as well.
To locate the other end of the path, Compass Harbor, drive along Main Street and head out of town along route 3 in the direction of Otter Creek. You will pass the Bar Harbor ball fields on the right as you leave town, and just ahead the road will begin going uphill. Look for a tiny unmarked parking lot on the left - even though this is part of Acadia National Park on this end, they do not mark it with a sign telling you its Compass Harbor. There will be a trail with a gate across it, that is the start of the compass Harbor trail.

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Dorr Mountain Trail
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11 Completed 10 Reviews

Dorr mountain is a very popular mountain to hike, but what many hikers don't know is just around the corner from the main hiking trail is the Homans Trail. The trail was a bit of a mystery from the start - it was built to climb high up the side of dorr mountain, using stone steps for most of the way, and it suddenly ends. Some named it The Stairway To Nowhere. and after the great fire, when the park service began abandoning many of the popular hiking trails in the park, the Homans trail also was abandoned. Over the years it became the forgotten trail, until it was re-discovered in recent years and reopened.
If your going to hike Dorr Mountain - hike this path, and bring along a camera. But before you can hike the Homans trail, you first have to find it. Like I said, it has now been reopened, but the trail head could not be in a worse spot. To locate the Homans trail, you need to drive to the Sieur de Monts Spring parking lot, where the Wild Gardens of Acadia National Park and the Nature Center are also located. You can reach that area three ways, off of route 3 as your heading toward Otter creek, or along the One Way section of the Park Loop road, signs let you know when your there.
The other way to get there is by catching one of the Island Explorer free buses from the Bar Harbor village Green. You want to board the Sand Beach Bus - Sieur de Monts is one of its stops.
Once at the parking lot, go to the far end of the parking lot, to the right - where you will find a fireroad with a gate across it. Follow the fire road until you come to a four way intersection, there will be a trail to the right that's a boardwalk running through the woods. Keep going straight, about a car length or two, and you will see the trail head sign for the Homans Trail.
The trail curves through the woods a short ways before coming to the first steps. After a short ways the trail comes to a cool spot where one has to bend low and pass through a hole in the granite - make sure not to bump your head as your passing through it. On the other side the trail turns to the left and begins its climb up the mountain side using stone steps.
Soon you come to the next amazing spot on the trail, a very narrow passage that passes between two huge walls of granite. By itself that would be neat, but when the trail was built, George B. Dorr, the founder of Acadia National Park, had work crews place a huge section of granite over the top of this narrow passage, and you almost feel like your passing through a cave.
Stone steps continue to rise upward until you reach the place where the trail use to end. There are some fantastic views along this path, but the best view is still up ahead.
I believe the park service has added a connector path from this to the most popular trail up dorr mountain, but if not, everyone follows a worn path to the left, just a short ways to the more popular path.
Once on the main dorr Mountain path, continue onward to the summit, which is still some distance away. Where that worn path meets the other trail, that is where you get an amazing view and you want a camera with you.

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Jessup Trail
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11 Completed 10 Reviews

The Jesup path is a short trail running between the one way section of the Park Loop road to Sieur de Monts Spring and the Wild Gardens of Acadia National Park. Most people who hike it begin by the Wild Gardens. To reach the trail you need to get to Sieur de Monts Spring, either by way of the One Way section along the Park Loop Road (look for signs) or by driving along route 3 from Bar Harbor, heading toward Otter Creek.
Once at the parking lot, you want to go to the far end of the parking lot to the right, where there is a gated fire road. Follow the fire road a short ways and you will come to a four way intersection, The Jesup trail is to the right - you can't miss it because it will be the only boardwalk there. The board walk is long and runs through the woods, with places along the way to sit and rest.
At the other end of the boardwalk the trail turns to dirt and continues on toward the Park Loop road, running through a meadow and by wetlands as it does.
The trail is easy and kids seem to love running along the boardwalk. The meadow itself is great for bird watching and as you pass wet areas, look at the mud for animal tracks. Deer, rabbit and beaver tracks are often found here.

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Wonderland Trail
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11 Completed 10 Reviews

The Wonderland trail in Seawall, in Acadia National Park - in my opinion is far better than Ship Harbor Nature trail just down the road from it. If you have the time do both, but if time is short and you can only do one, Wonderland might be the better choice. there are several reasons I say this.
First, Ship Harbor only has a limited area where you can get close to the water and explore. Wonderland has many areas where you can explore close to the waters edge..
Second - wonderland has a beach, ship Harbor doesn't.
Third, there are not one, but two small coves at either end of Wonderland ripe for young kids to explore.
The trail starts out at the parking lot on 102A, just beyond the Seawall Picnic area and Seawall Campground. A very small area at the start of the trail passes under tree's and their roots poke up into the ath. From there the trail, which is actually an old fire road, makes a straight line for the ocean, passing through woods and open areas as it goes.
Wonderland has always been a place where hikers go off on side trips through the woods and there are several mini trails that go off in different directions off off the fire road. Most lead to dead ends, but not all of them. One leads to an old granite mining site, another leads to a small beach, and a couple lead to spots where people have done some illegal camping.
The trail is rough in places with rocks and washed out areas in the trail, so a baby stroller can be brought on it, but be prepared to carry it over some stretches of the trail, which is what we had to do.
The main trail comes to a beach at the end, with a small cove to the far right where wire lobster traps sometimes wash up onto shore. Between the beach and the cove are several tide pools to explore - baby shrimp and crags are common here.
The trail turns past the beach and comes to a loop. Going right the trail stays within sight of the ocean, before passing some old stone steps. The trail turns again and there are a few areas to reach the waters edge. Driftwood washes up here, and off to the left is a second small cove with a small beach exposed at low tide.
The trail continues, passing a short cut to that small beach, before turning again and finishing the loop.
You might catch the sight of fishing boats, sail boats, or if your really lucky see the Maine Sea Coast vessel THE SUNBEAM as it passes.
This trail can be reached by bus from the Bar Harbor village Green, for free. You want to board the Southwest Harbor Bus at the Green, and let the driver know you want to get off at the Wonderland Trail. You can wave a passing bus down for the trip back to Bar Harbor.

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Eagle Lake
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11 Completed 10 Reviews

Eagle Lake is a great place for several reason, one being it is one of the key starting points for the Carriage roads. In summer and fall the Island explorer free bus system has a special van that ferry's bikes and riders from the Bar Harbor village Green to Eagle Lake, so you don't even have to drive there, catch the free van.
What many don't know is it is also a great place to fish. I have watched as nice lake trout were hauled from the waters of the lake. You can also boat on the lake as well, but swimming is not allowed because the lake a the town of Bar Harbors drinking water.
From the Eagle Lake carriage road, heading left, it is not too long of a hike to reach Bubble pond, a beautiful pond in the shadow of Cadillac Mountain, where at dusk Loons can be spotted and heard.
But Eagle Lake also has a couple of secrets. One is the steam boat that use to ferry passengers across the lake back in the days when a cog train carried people to the summit of Cadillac mountain. After the train went bankrupt, the steam boat was sunk to the bottom of the lake, where it still rests.
The other secret of the lake is the abandoned house of the Lake. Back in the late 1800's a family purchased land on the lake and started to build a house by the water. The problem was they never got permission from the town, and the town ordered the house not be built. Instead of tearing the house down, the family just left it there, where it sits today. The reason they were ordered to stop building was because the house was too close to the towns drinking water supply.
Because the path through the woods leading to the house is unmarked, it could be considered a ghost or phantom trail.

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