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Best Trails

Looking Glass Rock Trail

Brevard, NC

Hiking
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Walking
Camping

Looking Glass Rock Trail is a 6.4 mile trail located near Brevard, North Carolina and is rated as moderate. The trail is primarily used for hiking and is accessible year-round.

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Recent Reviews

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Looking Glass Rock Trail
by

9 Completed 9 Reviews

The path is clearer marked and the view at the top is absolutely breathtaking! It was a nice hike up to the top, with the path being mostly covered by trees. Overall a wonderful hike and will be making another visit.

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Pink Beds Trail
by ginzing B

1 Completed 1 Reviews

The trail is beautiful, but horribly marked. My friend and I decided to give it a try on a weekend drive through Pisgah Forest looking for a good place to hike. We'd never hiked there before, but when we arrived at the main parking lot we noticed the map at the entrance of the trail was faded in such a way that any mile markers or distance information was completely nonexistent. We were able to see the loop layout on the map and assumed (foolishly, apparently) it would be one or two miles - boy were we wrong! Not only was all distance information gone there at the trailhead, but NONE of the trail marker posts along the way said absolutely ANYTHING about distance. We started the trail walking for awhile through some very beautiful marshy areas with well made boardwalks and footbridges over creeks and swampy areas (and, oddly, what must have been the older bridges had been left just sort of jutting out of the water a few feet away from the new path). After 70 minutes or so, well into the forest trail, we started to wonder how much longer we had to go - in part because it had just started to rain, although we weren't yet getting much of it yet thanks to the dense forest leaves above our heads. After awhile we met a couple country type men carrying fishing poles coming from the other direction, and I asked them if we were about to the parking area, assuming we would get a yes. To my shock and horror one of them said we had about 2 and a half more hours to go, unless we turned back and took another trail that intersected with the one we were on, which they called a shortcut that would make it about another hour and a half. This was really F%$#& bad news considering the rain by this point was picking up steadily to the point our clothes were getting wet even when under the thick leaf canopy... We thanked the men and kept walking, talking over whether we should take their word for it and turn back to take the other turn, turn back and go home the way we went, or just keep going and hope that they were wrong (they did keep alternating between saying we had 2.5 MILES to go and 2.5 HOURS to go, so we weren't quite sure which was true, if either...). Considering we weren't quite sure which turn off they meant and which way on it to go, and as two females were a little reluctant to walk with these two men - the only people we had seen on the trail for quite some time - who seemed nice but still were strangers - we opted to just keep going the way we were headed. This damn trail seemed to go on forever, and as pretty as it was in parts with big fields of ferns and open meadows of grass and wildflowers, it's really hard to enjoy nature no matter how beautiful when you're completely soaking wet - as we quickly became when the shower turned into a complete downpour (not in the forecast, btw), and you have absolutely no idea when or if you will ever make it back. The trail markers were so incredibly unhelpful, even when we finally came to one at a trail intersection about 1.5 hours later that said "parking lot" (YAY THANK YOU JESUS!!!!!) it gave no info about distance and didn't make it very clear which of the intersecting trails was the one to take. My friend and I disputed it for awhile and decided we should just stay the same way we had been going, which eventually led us there, but only after what felt like an unbelievably long time considering how long we'd already walked. All in all it was just such a miserable and slightly terrifying experience that the pleasantness of the trail itself was completely eclipsed, which would never have happened if the map at the trailhead or trail posts along the way had distance info. I was really surprised to see afterwards that this trail is said to be only 4.5 miles long, because it definitely seemed much longer, and considering it took us a little over 3 hours to walk it at a steady and fairly brisk pace (you don't dally in a downpour) I'm a bit skeptical. This could be a really nice hike if you know what you're in for, but for the complete lack of warning for those that don't, I have to rate it pretty low.

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Looking Glass Rock Trail
by

1 Completed 1 Reviews

Awesome! A girl friend and I did this with a 38lb toddler on my back and one 5 year old, definitely was a moderate trail. Not at all easy. The trail was very challenging and rewarding all in the same. A must do if you're in the Pisgah area!

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Looking Glass Rock Trail
by

2 Completed 2 Reviews

This hike is all about the view at the end. You will be in the trees for most of the hike, with an average grade greater than 10%. Make sure you take water with you. I shared an extra bottle of green tea with a couple who were quite parched at the top. Once at the top, carefully explore a little for some great views. There were a good number of people at the top (15 or so) on the Sunday we went. We snacked and enjoyed the view for over an hour. Head over to the left as far as you can go, scrambling over rocks and through a few trees for a nice secluded area away from everyone.

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Looking Glass Rock Trail
by

1 Completed 1 Reviews

First hike ever so nothing to compare it to but it is a stunning view at the top. It was difficult for me but also first time on a mountain. Can't wait to return.

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Looking Glass Rock Trail
by

1 Completed 1 Reviews

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Pink Beds Trail
by

20 Completed 2 Reviews

Yes, this a relatively flat hike, but be sure to wear sturdy shoes. There are heavy areas of tree roots! That being said, the trail, if you go clockwise, starts out with great vistas of meadows and sunshine. The end crosses an amazingly well made boardwalk by a group of young people from Ohio. You think the path will
never end, and the you are greeted with large areas of wood ferns, absolutely lovely. The beauty of ending the trail , going clockwise, is that you are a bit tired and hot but you are in the shade!

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Looking Glass Rock Trail
by

1 Completed 1 Reviews

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Twin Falls
by Reed Friddle

9 Completed 3 Reviews

This is a very nice hike on a very well maintained trail. Most of the trail is wet, but there are foot bridges for just about every creek crossing. Much of the trail is also a horse trail, so it is wide and has a lot of clearance. If you hike the big loop, you need a map which is included in the link below. We hiked Avery Creek Trail(327), Buckhorn Gap Trail(103), Twin Falls up and back, Buckhorn Gap Trail(103), FS5058, Clawhammer Cove Trail(342), Avery Creek Trail(327). This is an easy to moderate hike. The falls are absolutely amazing after a nice rain.

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Art Loeb Trail
by

1 Completed 1 Reviews

Hardest and most rewarding trail I've done. My 9 month old Aussie mix and I did the entire 33 mile trail from South to North, Davidson River Campground to Daniel Boone Boy Scout Camp in 2 nights, 3 days. The weather was terrible, the views were scarce due to fog/rain, and the elevation gain was more drastic than I expected. And we really did 39 miles but I'll get to that in a bit. All that said, it was a great trip.

I got to Daniel Boone around dusk on a Thursday night and slept in my car on the gravel road that's reserved for thru hikers as there are no campsites here that aren't private.

I called a shuttle a couple days in advance (harry@ashevilleairportshuttle.com) to take me from Daniel Boone to Davidson Friday morning. If you elect to do the whole thing I highly recommend taking a shuttle and there are none better than Harry. He's a local that's done the entire AT, as well as the Art Loeb, and charges a flat rate of $100 which is as cheap as I found.

The second I stepped out of the shuttle the bottom fell out of the sky. It rained the majority of the trip, especially the first two days. I got on trail about 9:15 and went about 2 miles when I ran into two girls my age (mid 20's) that were doing the whole trail as well, so we decided to go at it together. Somewhere between mile 3-5 we missed a trail mark on our left when we hit a clearing and followed an old service road that looked like a wide trail for about 2 miles until we realized we were going the wrong way. We doubled back, found the trail mark, and pressed on. The trail the majority of the first day was a moderate incline that took a bit of a toll, but was manageable. We passed Butter Gap around 6:00 and camped about a half mile up. There is a water source at Butter Gap!

We got a late start on Day 2 (about 9:15) and went for roughly 2 miles before we hit the hardest part of the trip. Pilot Mtn. It was my first experience with switchbacks and rocky terrain in a torrential downpour. We went what seemed like straight up for an eternity and the rain didn't let up until we hit the peak. The sky cleared and the views were phenomenal. We stayed on Pilot for about 20 minutes and headed back down the other side.

We reached Deep Gap around 1:00 and stopped for lunch. We were exhausted and didn't leave until almost 3:00. The rain let up while we were in the shelter but it let loose the second we packed up to leave. 90% of the rest of that day was uphill. Some switchbacks, some gradual inclines, and some steps. We got to the road about 6:00 and followed to the left about 3/4 of a mile to a campsite with a water source near by. We were absolutely dead by the time we got the camp set up and got into dry clothes.

Weather delayed us again on day 3 and we started around 9:00. We got lost about 2 miles into the trail. The Mountains to Sea Trail is also marked with a white trail mark and the two intersect near the parkway. We followed the MST downhill in the wrong direction and ended up well out of the way. We made our way back at the top of Black Balsam but the weather stole our view.

The rest of the trail is fairly downhill after Black Balsam. The terrain gets a little tough and there are some dangerous downhill sections a few miles after Black Balsam. Water is scarce at this point and the trail isn't very well marked. The last 4-5 miles seemed like 15 but they were downhill so it wasn't awful. We got back to our cars around 6:30.

All around great experience. I recommend really knowing your water sources, bring trekking poles. and try to actually stay on the trail. Plan for 3 days, 2 nights if you're going South to North unless you are extremely experienced.

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